Have you ever sat in a waiting room, stared at a picture, and realized it drove you nuts? Our loved ones may feel the same way if they don’t like the artwork in their home or room. Some artwork is actually upsetting. We can make loved ones feel at home by paying attention to the art.

In fact, many believe art can heal. That’s why hospitals display paintings, sculpture, place artwork in gardens, and have volunteers that distribute art. If the patient doesn’t like the artwork in their room he or she may choose a different picture from the art cart, a decision that makes them feel more in control of their life.

Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN thinks there is a connection between art and healing. In its pamphlet, Art & Healing, the clinic describes this connection. “Mayo Clinic has always believed that restoring the mind and spirit is an important part of making the body well—and that art and science together play a role in the healing process.”  The pamphlet goes on to say that Mayo’s art collection, which includes all branches, humanizes its medical environment and can be a source of hope in a time of uncertainty. Mayo Clinic’s art collection is extensive: paintings, murals, mobiles, sculpture, fabric art, furniture, seasonal displays and more.

While family caregivers like us can’t develop extensive art programs, we can tap the power of art. Asking our loved ones some questions is a good place to start. What kind of art do you like best? Do like lots of different colors or prefer one color? Which do you prefer, traditional art, folk art, modern art, paintings, different kinds of prints, photos, or sculpture?

The answers to these questions help you determine which art to display. These suggestions will also be helpful.

lincoln memorial

Use art to prompt memories

Years ago, family members chipped in and took Pampa, the patriarch of the family, to an historic Civil War battle site. As we walked along pathways, we came to a monument honoring Minnesota soldiers.  Dad wanted to take a family photo here and we flagged down some passing Boy Scouts. I had the photo framed and Dad loved it.

Hang pictures lower for the disabled

My husband spends his days in a wheelchair. I built a wheelchair accessible townhome for us. When I hung the pictures I positioned them lower than usual so my husband could see them without hurting his neck. Instead of putting the television above the fireplace, which is a popular trend, I placed it on a shelf to the left of the fireplace.  

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Display holiday artwork

Seasonal decorating can boost a loved one’s spirits.  Because we have to keep traffic patterns clear for my husband’s wheelchair, we don’t have a large Christmas tree. Instead, we have a huge poinsettia (a gift from a relative) and display family decorations. Our home looks festive.

Rotate artwork

Changing artwork keeps loved ones interested in their environment. Put a picture away for a while and replace it with another one. Unify mismatched artwork with similar frames. Black frames always seem to work well. So do wood frames.

taking a book out from the art library

If you don’t have any artwork, take out art books from the library for your loved one. Discuss the books together. When we pay attention to artwork we are expressing love. Being smart about art makes loved ones feel better and we feel better too.

About Harriet Hodgson

Rochester resident Harriet Hodgson has been a freelance writer for 37 years, is the author of thousands of Internet/print articles, and 35 books. She is a member of the Association of Health Care Journalists and the Minnesota Coalition for Death Education and Support.

She is also a contributing writer for The Caregiver Space website, Open to Hope Foundation website, and The Grief Toolbox website. Harriet has appeared on more than 185 radio talk shows, including CBS Radio, and dozens of television stations, including CNN.

A popular speaker, Harriet has given presentations at public health, Alzheimer’s, caregiving, and bereavement conferences. Her work is cited in Who’s Who of American Women, World Who’s Who of Women, Contemporary Authors, and other directories.

All of Harriet’s work comes from her life. She is now in her 19th year of caregiving and cares for her disabled husband, John. For more information about this busy author, grandmother, wife, and caregiver please visit www.harriethodgson.com

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