Author: Guest Author

My husband is dying and I don’t know myself

I spend a lot of time thinking about hospice care these days. As my husband’s health declined it was as if we could hear the clock ticking more loudly. All the plans we’d made for growing old, the life we’d imagined, was not going to happen. If our lives were a movie, we’d be going bungie jumping right now. Unfortunately, not all of us will be healthy enough to travel the world and live it up until our last days. My husband’s decline was slow at first and has sped up more recently. He can barely muster up the...

Read More

Many Cancer Survivors Change Their Prescription Drug Use for Financial Reasons

A new analysis indicates that many cancer survivors change their prescription drug use (including skipping doses or requesting cheaper medications) for financial reasons. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the study provides important information on the financial burden experienced by cancer survivors, suggesting non-elderly cancer survivors are particularly vulnerable to this phenomenon. Although research has shown that cancer drugs can represent considerable costs for cancer patients and their families, there is limited information about changes in prescription drug use for financial reasons among cancer survivors. To further investigate this, researchers from the...

Read More

Retail Savings Guide for People with Disabilities

In this guide, let’s look at ways those with disabilities can stretch their dollars. The purpose here is not to portray anyone as “less than” or “needing special help.” For us, the bottom line is “If you can save money, why not do it?” We just want to make sure you know about the options. There’s one thing we know for sure: people like Jon Morrow, Joni Eareckson Tada, Stephen Hawking, and so many others, prove that a disability doesn’t mean “incapable.” Not by a long shot. Discounts, Services, and Special Offers Available to People with Disabilities Here’s a...

Read More

31 tips for future-proofing your home

Taking preventive steps to help reduce the risks of injuries sustained from falls and slips can improve a senior’s quality of life. Aging adults can make accommodations to their home by age proofing their home to minimize future in-home accidents.  Age-proofing a home isn’t about remodeling the entire house. Safety updates can be as simple as eliminating clutter or installing new light bulbs. Although purchasing a fire extinguisher, buying a new bed, or paying contractors to install handrails or an in-home elevator may all require spending some money however, these costs are helpful investments to ensure a senior’s safety...

Read More

Happy and Mobile in Old Age

As we grow old, our bodies and immune system becomes weak and we get prone to developing various health issues. In addition to the possibility of developing various diseases commonly associated with old age, such as dementia, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases, increasing age also limits our mobility. Joint pain and arthritis are common problems among the elderly. Even if people take good care of themselves and keep the diseases at bay, they do get affected by mobility issues as they age which affect the quality of their lives. Here comes the role of assistive technology. Commonly known as mobility...

Read More

10 Financial Questions All Parents Must Discuss With Their Children Before It’s Too Late

No one can predict the future. As mom and dad start to age and life gets a little more challenging, we do our best to tend to their medical needs to keep them as healthy for as long as possible. But one area that is often overlooked by many parents and their kids is having the money talk. Who inherits any assets that mom and dad have? Who oversees the estate? Is there enough money to pay for a home healthcare worker if needed? When illness or death strikes, it’s a stressful time. To make things easier on everyone,...

Read More

I can’t be ON all the time

Being a 24/7 caregiver means there’s someone who needs you 24/7. But I’m learning to accept that it’s just not possible. Believe me, I tried. For the first few months I was unstoppable! Any time Joe needed me, I was there in an instant. It didn’t matter what I was doing, how tired I was, or how many other things needed to get done. And then I couldn’t do it any more. I started to slow down. I started to get sick all the time. I started to get angry. There used to be two of us in this...

Read More

Beginning or End: There is No Substitute for Love

I once tried to make a list of the things we respond to from the day we are born, and one of the first ways we bond with a parental figure is by communicating our feelings through tears or laughter. Mother and father then have to listen carefully to how we make ourselves understood so they can react accordingly. A loving parent usually ends up able to interpret each nuance in their child’s sounds and demeanor. Later, when we learn to express ourselves with words, we have a deep need to share each new experience with someone who cares....

Read More

Are You Helping Your Elderly Parent, Or Just Yourself?

I still remember the days when my parents chose my wardrobe. They paid for my clothes and therefore I had to wear what they wanted. Needless to say, their selections were less than fashionable, resulting in me getting a healthy dose teasing on the playground. This helped me learn a valuable lesson: when others get to make decisions on your behalf, it’s really hard for them to set aside their own tastes and motives. I call this the Decision Maker Bias. Are you falling prey to decision maker bias? Click To Tweet Many decades later, I now find myself...

Read More

The 6 issues family caregivers face

When it comes to eldercare, America is facing a disconnect between fantasy and fact. That’s the theme for the new book Eldercare Confidential: Cautionary Tales for Adult Caregivers and Caretakers of Parents and Spouses. “We all have this idea of an eldercare Shangri-La, where our parents can live and have their every need taken care of,” said the book’s author, Chris Cooper. “We all think that this care home will be funded by the government and that we will be relieved of heart-wrenching caregiver decisions.” Unfortunately, that place doesn’t exist, Cooper said. “It’s the Shady Acres myth, and even...

Read More

Yelling

The other day I stopped by my dad’s place and caught the home health aide yelling at him. At first I was livid. How could she treat him that way? She’s here to keep him safe and take care of him and she was clearly failing at that. Yelling at someone with dementia is only going to agitate them and make the situation worse. Don’t they train home health aides? And then I stepped back. Because, well, I’m not proud of it, but I’ve yelled at my dad, too. I realized I was about to yell at her for...

Read More

Music Can Be A Major Key To Therapeutic Healing

Music plays a significant role in nearly everyone’s life, but for some people it represents much more than an invitation to dance or a soundtrack for the morning commute. Researchers have found that music therapy provides a diversion from negative feelings and helps manage the pain of not only adults, but of children with developmental, physical, behavioral, and neurological disabilities. It also increases range of motion and motor skills, and in some cases is a replacement for medication. In short, its therapeutic uses are many. “Music is invaluable to people with special needs, allowing them to express themselves non-verbally,”...

Read More

Wearing a hat from hell

I have never written a blog. Don’t quite know what a blog is. The one blog I have read was part of a novel. As far as I can tell blogs are rants. Mental diarrhea spilled on a page for strangers. So, fellow caregivers wearing a hat from hell, do you talk of ending it all? Use the no-no word — death? Ooops. Aren’t I supposed to love my role, the God-given opportunity of service, the privileged chance to score a heaven-entry ticket like the pre-check and global card we flash to airport security. Admit it people, you are persona non-fff-ing-grata,...

Read More

3 Ways To Talk With Aging Parents About Finances

One benefit of the increasing life expectancies for Americans is that more people have bonus years for enjoying the company of their aging parents. But all is not rosy. Those extended years also boost the odds that parents could go broke or suffer from dementia and be unable to make financial decisions for themselves. That can leave adult children perplexed about when and whether they should step in and find out what’s happening with their parents’ money, says Carolyn Rosenblatt, a registered nurse and elder law attorney. “Unfortunately, it’s not always easy to have those conversations,” says Rosenblatt, co-author...

Read More

10 steps to being the executor of an estate

As the oldest child, my mother has been called upon to serve as the executrix for multiple family members. I recently asked her what was involved with executing a will and she was kind enough to write this up for us: Being named executor of someone’s estate is a daunting task, involving patience, fortitude and responsibility. Talk with the individual about his/her wishes and financial holdings when you are both calm and clear-headed, well BEFORE the final act.The conversation should include funeral arrangements; location of the legal will; where financial docs, passbooks, stock certificates, deeds, etc. are kept; how the contents of the home should be distributed; if...

Read More

Dark thoughts

I don’t want to stop being a caregiver, but I think I’ve reached that point where I need respite. I dreamt I murdered my mother last night. It’s true that I’ve been feeling really exhausted lately. More than just physically tired, really exhausted in the depths of my soul. But I had no idea how in need of a rest I really was. That’s how caregiving is. Not taking care of her isn’t an option, so I just keep going, no matter how exhausted I am. I have so many things I need to do for me, for us,...

Read More

How diabetes affects wound healing

Caring for a loved one living with diabetes is quite a responsibility and when it comes to the approximately 29.1 million people living with diabetes in the U.S., it’s important to know the types of complications your loved one may face as a result of the disease. What many people may not know is that diabetes can result in diabetic foot ulcers. Healogics, Inc. encourages those living with diabetes and their caregivers to know how to take good care of their feet. Diabetes can cause problems for your feet! Click To Tweet Healogics is a wound care services management...

Read More

Dear President Trump

Plenty of us are happy to see Obamacare go. It was too expensive, too confusing, and forced us to find new doctors. You have a new chance to build something great. To save lives and help Americans secure their futures. Far too many people go bankrupt for their health. Here’s what I’d like Trumpcare to include: Insurance covered in-home care How many of us have put careers on hold — or ended them early — because we can’t afford to pay out of pocket for home health aides? How many of us are forced to put loved ones in...

Read More

When the clock won’t stop

My mother won’t die. I know, it’s awful to say. I don’t particularly want her to die, but it’s inevitable. She’s dying. She’s been dying. I can’t change that. The problem is that she won’t let go of the dying part and move into the next phase. Dying is an awful, awful process. If you’ve ever seen someone who’s dying, you know what I mean. There’s nothing I can do to really make her comfortable. Her body is worn out. It’s bone against bone. Paper-thin skin. Everything aches. She’s too weak to do anything. But still she persists....

Read More

I don’t want to be my husband’s caregiver

Yes, we both said our vows. But how many of us break them? Most of us, at one point or another. Would he do this if our roles were reversed? Absolutely not. He’d be out of here in a minute. He was cheating on me when his spine was crushed in a car accident. I have no idea where he was going that afternoon. He was supposed to be at work. It could have been a work meeting, a lunch time errand, whatever. But obviously I’m going to believe it was to meet her. I had just found out, but...

Read More

A guide to end-of-life Medicaid planning

Just as we all made plans about whether we wanted to go to college, what college we wanted to go to, and how we would pay for it, so too, as we age, we need to plan for retirement and beyond, when that time comes to pass. Long-term care and, ultimately passing on, is an inevitable part of life, and coming up with a game plan can make a world of a difference. Senior Planning Services, a NJ-based company dedicated to assisting seniors and their families through the difficult Medicaid eligibility process, shares some important long-term care and end-of-life...

Read More

Caregiver Burnout and Respite Services

Caregiving is a difficult role. It’s filled with unexpected challenges, as well as physical and emotional turmoil that can lead to poor health. When you’re the primary caregiver to an aging loved one, their wellbeing is at the top of your priority list. However, taking some time for respite care can help you stay healthy too, so you can continue to provide quality care for a loved one at home. Here are a few respite care services that can support you in your role: In-Home Respite Care In-home respite care is one options that families utilize to support aging...

Read More

10 questions to ask your parents today

As the years go by and mom and dad age, life can become complicated.  Certain things are practically impossible to prepare for, while others, like finances, can and should be organized and taken care of early on. What do you need to know about your parents’ finances? Kurt Kazanowski, a hospice, homecare and senior care expert, who is author of A Son’s Journey: Taking Care of Mom and Dad, says children should know the answers to these 10 questions when it comes to their parents’ finances. Have they named a durable power of attorney to manage their finances? The...

Read More

New Years resolutions for unglamorous lives

Right after the accident, my life was sort of glamorous in a weird, morbid way. Everyone stopped what they were doing to rally around and pitch in. We’re young, none of our friends had experienced this before, and we were lucky enough to have friends who went all out. It was so tragic — the last time some people had seen us was at our wedding, cue the tears. It felt like our life was a movie, only in the end he didn’t make a miraculous recovery. After that, things stopped being a tragic love story and started to...

Read More

How a simple app can support you and your loved ones

Why did we decide to become a family caregiver? Because we put our loved ones first and want the best for them. We want them to be happy and as healthy as possible. Part of our duty as caregivers requires the administering of medication. Adhering to a medication plan can be a challenging task for any individual, let alone caregivers, who hold a far greater responsibility. According to a study by the World Health Organization 50% of all prescribed medications are either taken incorrectly or not at all. This can be fatal: In the US alone approximately 125,000 people...

Read More

start your week with a smile


Sign up to get our Monday morning emails with:

  • expert resources
  • stories from caregivers like you
  • a little bit of motivation
  • our weekly journal prompt
  • news that affects your life
  • join the conversation in our private caregiving facebook group

    Recently Active Members

    Profile picture of Cori Carl
    Profile picture of Bob Harrison
    Profile picture of barbward
    Profile picture of Georgine
    Profile picture of Iris Waichler
    Profile picture of Adrienne Gruberg
    Profile picture of John

    Ads to Support Us

    Ads to Support Us

    Skip to toolbar