The Challenges of Caring for a Loved One With Memory Loss in a Hospital Setting

The Challenges of Caring for a Loved One With Memory Loss in a Hospital Setting

One of the hardest challenges I experienced in caring for my father was helping take care of him when he was hospitalized. His memory got worse and his confusion was heightened being in a new setting. He suddenly became aggressive and agitated and had to be temporarily restrained which increased his agitation even more. I felt helpless and heartbroken.

It is not unusual for seniors to find themselves facing some type of medical problem due to a medical condition or accident that requires hospitalization. When you add that condition to someone who already has memory loss or confusion the need for specialty care becomes elevated. The first thing to do is understand why a hospitalization can trigger these types of reactions:

 

  • They may be in pain or uncomfortable because of the medical problem and not understanding why they are in the hospital. They may have to undergo medical treatment like x-rays, injections, IV’s, catheters, that can be very frightening and painful.
  • Their regular routine has changed and they may be unable to sleep in a hospital setting causing more confusion and fear.
  • They are in a new place with hospital staff that are strangers coming in their room all hours day and night which can be very frightening and confusing.
  • Delirium, or sudden mental confusion, can occur with a hospitalization. It can be triggered by an infection or extreme stress. Even people with no memory issues can suddenly have an altered memory status.

 

Now you have an understanding of what the potential reasons for enhanced memory or

behavior problems are. It is important to note there are concrete steps you can take to help

manage these problems or at least try to reduce the severity and longevity:

 

 

Work With Hospital Staff at time of Admission

The hospital staff needs to understand what your loved one’s baseline memory and functionality is so they can act quickly if changes are noted.

 

Have a Familiar Family Member Spend as much time as possible with the patient

Having someone your loved one knows be close by to help advise staff and calm the patient is very important. Just seeing a familiar face can reduce agitation and anxiety.

 

Discuss Hospital Policy on Management of Patient with Aggressive Behaviors

 

Talk to a doctor and hospital staff about what they recommend when these instances occur and patient and staff safety become problematical. They may suggest restraints or medication that can calm the patient.  Make sure you are OK with the plan. Do you want to be contacted if this occurs? Are you against the use of restraints? Ask about other options like a sitter or an alarm.

 

Consistency of Staff and Routine

Request that your loved one has the same nurse, nurses aide, or other staff when they are working. Having people a patient is familiar with can reduce the incidence of behavior problems or enhanced memory issues. Also having the same routine every day can be helpful. For example meals and physical/occupational/ speech therapy sessions at the same time can help orient a patient.

 

Placement of Patient

If your loved one is disruptive have him/her in a room closer to the nursing station and without a roommate. This helps ensure staff will be more attentive as issues arise. Not having a roommate disrupts the frequency of unfamiliar people coming in and out possibly causing regressive tendencies.

 

Visual and Verbal Reminders

Try to have a clock and calendar visible to help orient your loved one. Have photos of family members with names on them. When visiting, speak softly in short sentences identifying who you are. Be in front of the your loved one by their face so you can be seen and they are aware you are there. Hospital staff should be advised to also use these techniques. Remind patient’s why they are in the hospital. Refer to your loved one by name or relationship, i.e.. “Dad this is Iris, your daughter.”

 

Use Calming Techniques

Using a smile or gentle touch can go a long way to calming an agitated person.

Don’t dispute or argue about what they are saying. Instead try to understand why they are saying it. My father told me he saw a cow outside his hospital room. Rather than discounting it I looked out his window. I noticed a piece of construction equipment that was oddly shaped and looked like it might have horns. I asked him if that was the cow? It was. Use reassuring words. If they seem worried about something ask why. 

Don’t try to rush them into doing something. Allow time for them to prepare and explain what is going to happen in understandable steps. Offer reassurance that you will be there as things that might cause anxiety will be happening.

 

Bring Familiar Items from Home

If your loved one has a special pillow, blanket, clock or photograph, bring it to the hospital. If they like specific music, use that as something to do together during your visit. If they wear glasses, dentures, hearing aids make sure they are there because that can help with communication and orientation. Things can easily get misplaced or disappear from a hospital room so keep track of where they are placed as much as possible. 

Good communication is a key component in making the hospital stay go as well as possible. Make sure that information about your loved one’s deficits is placed in their chart, their care plan, and if there is a board in the hospital room for special care instructions place it there. Also you can write this information on a piece of paper and hang it on the wall near their bed. If you see new staff working with your loved one, make sure they are aware of any special concerns or care needs. These steps can bring peace of mind and lessen anxiety for all concerned parties.

How to Begin the Conversation About Care and Aging

How to Begin the Conversation About Care and Aging

If you have a loved one who is aging the issue is not if but when a time will come that additional help may be needed. In my experience as a medical social worker and a caregiver for my parents I know this is a conversation that is very difficult to initiate. Nobody likes to talk about aging, illness or death. Let’s be honest, this is something we all will face. This conversation involves tackling tough topics:

  • Getting sick and not being able to care for yourself.
  • What do you want done if you are unable to make medical decisions for yourself.
  • How do you feel about aging and eventually facing your own death?
  • What insurance or money do you have available if you need additional help?
  • Is it time to leave the place you have called home?
  • Is your will or healthcare power of attorney properly completed?

 

You want to start this conversation from a place of love and caring. It also has to be a collaboration. You also have to start slowly and be aware that it is a process. This will not be one discussion but a series of talks over time as circumstances change and new challenges may arise.

There are things you can do to help it go as smoothly as possible:

 

Start Early

Begin the conversation when your parents are alert and healthy and can make decisions from a competent place. They will be more comfortable and less defensive having this discussion when there are no current problems or deficits.

Wait for an Opening or Create One

Move slowly. Mention a friend whose parents are ill or that you are updating your will. Suggest that it got you thinking about your mom and dad. Ask if they have thought about aging and what they would want to happen? What kind of help would they want and from who? Would they want to remain at home or consider moving to a place where more support might be available?

Motivation

Share the reason you are wanting to talk about this. You want them to be safe, prepared, and understand what options are available for them. You are not angry at them and don’t believe they are incompetent if that is true. Tell them you want them to continue to have as much quality in their life as possible and you want to contribute to make that happen.

Timing

Make sure the time you initiate this discussion is optimal. Don’t do it when you have to leave in half an hour. Do it when there are no distractions or additional people that don’t need to be a part of the conversation. Don’t include too many people because that may make your senior feel more defensive. Choose a stress free time to initiate this talk.

Participants

If you have a good relationship with your parents than you may be the ideal candidate to initiate this talk. If not you may want to include a trusted family member  friend, doctor, priest, neighbor, that can help your loved ones feel more comfortable about addressing these sensitive topics. If you are doing this with someone else you may want to meet ahead of time to plan on what direction you want the conversation to go and who will play what role. Rehearse what you want to say and try to anticipate their responses. Make sure the message you give your parents with someone else is a unified message.

Choose the opening topic

You don’t want to throw out all of these major questions at one time. That will feel overwhelming and cause any future discussion to derail. Pick the topic that you believe is most relevant to them and one that your parents will be most open to.

Maybe they just came back from a doctor visit. You can use that as a place to begin to address questions about potential health concerns. If you know they are feeling their home is becoming harder to maintain that gives you an entry way to ask about what their thoughts are  about the next step if the house becomes increasingly hard to manage.

Some Final Thoughts

If the conversation does not go well don’t be discouraged.  A process has begun that you can return to and reference at a future date. Take notes about what has been said. Perhaps you can all agree on a future time to set including whatever requests your parents make regarding the parameters. Maybe the participants can agree to gather information to facilitate the next meeting. Ask your parents if there is someone else they would like to attend future discussions.

Try to remain empathetic and compassionate with each other as you enter this uncharted water. If it is clear you need an impartial mediator to manage the discussion you might want to get a geriatric care manager. They can be found at aginglifecare.org.

Finally, be patient. This is new territory for you all. When a parent agrees to work through these issues, there is no greater gift they can give you.  

Coping With Grief During the Holidays

Coping With Grief During the Holidays

Holidays are often considered a time for celebrating. We honor traditions and reminisce about past holidays and the people we shared them with.  The very thing we love about holidays can be the source of pain and renewed grief if someone we love is no longer with us to share in these moments.

Why is this time of year so difficult for those of us grieving the loss of a loved one?

  • It reinforces the idea that things will not be the same without that person.
  • You may feel some guilt for trying to celebrate a holiday or special occasion.
  • Awkward, painful moments may arise while celebrating that magnify the loss.

 

If you recognize that the upcoming holidays may be challenging there are some things you can do that will help you to cope. It means you may have to be proactive and plan ahead but this will be time well spent.

Ways to Cope During the Holidays

  1. Honor old traditions if that feels good. If not create new traditions that are meaningful.
  2. Give yourself permission to get more support from family, friends, counselors, clergy.
  3. Think about previous ways you coped with losses in the past that were successful and revisit them.
  4. If the stress of gifts, cooking, being social, feels too stressful/painful, ask family or friends to help with cooking. Ask for a year off buying gifts. Ask for permission to take time off to take care of yourself and focus on self care. It is OK to take time away from the festivities if you feel you need to.
  1. Be proactive. Have an honest discussion with the people you normally spend time with at a holiday and discuss what you would like to do and why. That helps you feel like you are not planning on your own and it is more of a group, co-operative event. You may not all agree but at least you will understand everyone else’s position.
  1. Find new ways of honoring the memory of a loved one. If they loved flowers plant or donate a tree. If they loved children, donate to a children’s charity in the name of your loved one. Maybe you might want to volunteer at a program that was meaningful to a loved one who has passed away.

Iris Waichler, MSW, LCSW

Iris Waichler has been a patient advocate and licensed clinical social worker for 40 years. She is an award winning author. Her latest book, Role Reversal How to Take Care of Yourself and Your Aging Parents received a Finalist Best Book of 2016 Award from USA Books. Ms. Waichler has done individual, group and family counseling with patients and families facing catastrophic illnesses. She has done freelance writing on health and patient advocacy topics for 16 years. Her website is www.iriswaichler.wpengine.com
 and her Facebook page is https://www.facebook.com/RoleReversal1/
Mom’s Choice Gold Award Winner for Best Book of the Year.
Winner of the National Parenting Publications (NAPPA) Gold Award for best book of the year.
Winner of the finalist award for Foreword Magazine 2007 non-fiction Book of the Year.