The accidental caregiver

On December 12, 2001 an event unfolded into a life-changing experience for my family. My brother-in-law, Rodney, was in a car accident that on the surface appeared to be an urban collision. In my mind, it could not have rendered the life threatening catastrophic...

Breaking bad news

How do you tell someone that they’re seriously ill, or even dying? Chrissie Giles explores how doctors learn and how they deal with the stress and trauma, for both their patients and themselves. Listen to or download an audiobook of this story...

Take a New Look at the Yellow Crayon

Before he leaves for his outing, my father beckons me out onto the ramshackle porch of the rental cottage. He solemnly hands me a tablet of thick white artist’s paper and a pristine box of 24 crayons.  “I want you to get your mother interested in art again,” he says....

The man with the golden blood

Meet the donors, patients, doctors and scientists involved in the complex global network of rare – and very rare – blood. Listen to or download an audiobook of this story on SoundCloud and iTunes. His doctor drove him over the border. It was quicker that way: if the...

Can caregiving lead to PTSD?

Most people associate PTSD with veterans of war, but you don't have to be a soldier to experience this condition. The NIMH defines PTSD as 'a disorder that develops in some people who have experienced a shocking, scary, or dangerous event.' When people experience a...

My grandmother’s battle with Alzheimer’s

Over the past few years, my family has been involved with my grandmother’s battle with Alzheimer’s. I painted this portrait as a representation of her decline. Nancy Jane, 2015 Oil on Canvas 16 x 20 in. Madison Luetge graduated from Texas A&M University-Commerce...

Unexpected gifts

The following is an excerpt from Unexpected Gifts: My Journey with My Father's Dementia. My dad, Reuben Soldinger, was ill for nearly two years. His mind was confused about many things. Sometimes he thought he was at a hotel, not in a nursing home. Often he didn’t...

The Agony and the…..Agony of TBI

A traumatic brain injury is a game changer in life. We are now seeing a lot more attention devoted to brain injuries in the news and in health care due to the high profile athletes who are suffering from traumatic brain injuries, and for sake of readability referred...

Faces of Care: Martine Côté

Thérèse and Pierrot laughed together until his last day. It was their way to take care of each other, laughing and smiling. More than 30 years of Love. Martine Côté is a photographer in Quebec City. You can see more of Martine's work on her website, Facebook, or...

Ordinary Caregiving Days Add Up to Life

This is my 19th year of caregiving and I can hardly believe it. After a series of mini strokes my mother developed memory disease. I was her family caregiver for nine years. In 2007 my twin grandchildren’s parents died from the injuries they received in separate car...

What I learned about aging in place

  Making modifications to the home can help your loved ones age in place, a goal of an increasing amount of families. There are plenty of resources online that offer checklists and other pieces of advice that cover the most common modifications. With hindsight...

Faces of Care

We want to share your story! Every caregiver is unique -- we want to show the world what caregiving means. Send us your favorite photo of yourself, a selfie, or a photo that shows what caregiving means to you and we'll share it with the world....

Saying Goodbye, The Right Way

Ediccia wanted to be remembered as someone who didn’t give up. Chuck said some of his favorite times were playing baseball with his brothers. Joe said he was the luckiest man in the world. Abel summed it up this way: “You have a one-way ticket. Don’t waste it!” They...

Raising my HIV family

When one Romanian doctor became ‘father’ to 16 HIV-positive orphans in 1999, many thought there was no hope for them – or for the thousands of other children infected. What followed was something of a miracle. Geta Roman tells their story. Dr Paul Marinescu has chosen...

Dignity: A song about ALZ

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ViNUzFFeMVc Having lost a grandfather to Alzheimer's years ago and witnessing my grandmother's role as a caregiver become more and more necessary during his progression, I was inspired to write a piece from the viewpoint of a caregiver....

How do we know our parents are failing?

Nothing is more comforting than to know your parents are strong, vital, and running their lives on their own, living out their retirement dreams so you can live yours. It's easy to believe they are okay because that's what we want to believe. But people beginning to...

We’re Partnering With The Mighty!

We're thrilled to announce a new partnership that will bring The Caregiver Space's resources in front of The Mighty's wide-reaching readership. We will now have a growing home page on The Mighty and appear on many stories on the site, allowing us to get many more...

Have Courage and Be Kind

“Have courage and be kind” is one of those wonderfully memorable movie quotes to live by that is so simple yet so profound.  In the 2015 action version of the Disney film, Cinderella receives this advice from her dying mother. [Tweet "Have courage and be kind"] My...

TBI: Traumatic Brain Injury, the fallout

If someone had told me that I would be dealing with the effects of a car accident years after it occurred, I would have immediately assumed it would be due to the obvious damage to a person that results in broken bones and wheelchairs. I would never have thought of...

Lifting the arms of a caregiver

Exodus 17:8-16 There is an Old Testament story that tells us about the battle between Joshua and Amalek. The Amalekites had come up against the Israelites at Rephidim (which translated means resting place). Exodus 17 tells us that Israel’s caregiver, Moses, said to...

Coping through caring

The Kitchen Widow sits down with Audra Wilford, founder of the MaxLove Project. Together they talk about what it takes for young families to thrive in the face of illness.      

Frustrated

I am a single 37 year old female with four beautiful children who is taking care of my  92 year old Grandfather who has Alzheimer's, Dementia, and Stage 4 Bladder Cancer. I also just finished taking care of my Grandmother, which passed away last year from the same...

Embracing creativity as a caregiver

The last thing you may feel like doing when you are actively caregiving is engaging that creative spark. Heck, if you were creative before caregiving, you may believe that your creative fire has been extinguished forever. Be open to opportunities for expression during...

Three lessons from a simple story

Exodus 17:8-16 There is an Old Testament story that tells us about the battle between Joshua and Amalek. The Amalekites had come up against the Israelites at Rephidim (which translated means resting place). Exodus 17 tells us that Israel’s caregiver, Moses, said to...

Been There, Done That!

I was asked while attending church last Sunday why I had such a strong commitment to caring for those who had disabilities. The person asking the question was not being difficult, but really wanted to know why I had such a strong empathy for the disabled and if it had...

Informal support: it means we don’t get paid

After we posted the real reason we don't pay family caregivers, Carol Wright shared this response with us. Thank you for your very accurate picture of the longterm caregiver and also for the term "reciprocal altruism," which I have never heard used in my years of...

The real reason we don’t pay family caregivers

We hear it all the time -- and I'm sure we've all said it, too -- our society doesn't value family caregivers. It sure feels like we aren't valued. Doctors refuse to share vital information with us, while they're pushing more and more responsibilities on us --...

Mortality, Loss, and Finding Peace

Dealing with the loss of a loved one is emotional torture.  It can be wretched.  Almost violent in its disruption especially when loss comes as a surprise.  Death can be insufferable for those who are left behind and therefore mortality as a topic is generally...

Just fine

MOM HAS BEEN LIVING IN HER APARTMENT SINCE last October. Because she’s doing well on her own, Bill and I took two weeks to head south to sunny, warm Florida in January. We enjoyed the days being by ourselves. But a few days into our travels, Mom fell and broke her...

10 things I learned from caregiving

Not being a rainbow and pink unicorn kind of gal, I have to applaud the honesty of Ann Brenoff's recent piece on HuffPost entitled, “No, Caregiving is Not Rewarding. It Simply Sucks."  There isn’t a caregiver alive who can’t identify with that kind of bone-deep...

Caregivers’ dirty little secrets

As I share my experiences of being a caregiver for my parents, I find myself constantly questioning how many personal details I should be revealing about my parents' medical conditions. While common decency frowns upon TMI (Too Much Information), in the caregiving...

He would have been how old?

The Dog Days of August are upon us. It’s blisteringly hot in New York and at the beach and not only is there no escape from the heat, but there’s nowhere to go where the 26th of August, my late husband’s birthday, isn’t looming large on the calendar. March 19, 2016...

Dementia caregiving: Staying in the ‘okay’ part

Confession: I am a caregiver, and I have no idea what I’m doing. In the blink of an eye, I have shifted from a career as national vice president of sales to suddenly becoming the sole caregiver for my mother, who lives nearly 3,000 miles away. While I’m fortunate she...

Pancreatic Cancer

My husband has pancreatic cancer. It is almost always a death sentence. When it would have been treatable, there were no symptoms. Even if there were symptoms, there are no blood tests that will diagnose it. It is nasty, painful, and relentless. I watch my husband as...

Caregiving During Public Tragedy

On September 11th, 2001, I remember coming home from school to watch the television, the smoke and sirens in New York City filling the screen. I was greeted by my mother who was lying in the bed, a place she knew well. Nearly two years prior, my mother underwent a...

Letting Go of Broken Things

Looking back, I was such a bitch, when I first moved my mom into her care home. I used to walk in, inquiring, but demanding, why weren’t her shoes clean, or why was her hair all matted down. Or where did the cute little pillow with embroidered flowers go? How did a...

Caregiver grief & loneliness

On 28 December 2015 I posted Grief: a silent killer. In the article I discussed caregiving, grief, stress and the role they play in our long term well being. After reading over one hundred-fifty comments to the blog on the Caregiver Space Facebook page, I saw an...