Take care of yourself. We’ve all heard this advice. A short walk may be one way you care of yourself. You may bake a batch of cookies. Going to bed a half hour earlier may also be self-care. Or if you’re like me, you may sit down and read for pleasure. But knowing you need self-care and practicing it are two different things.

I know self-care is important, but it became more important after I fractured a bone in my right foot. I wish I could say I hurt my foot water skiing, or hiking in the mountains, or playing tennis. None of these are true. My excuse is boring: I hit my foot on a chair leg. “Well that hurt,” I muttered to myself.

Five days later my foot started to swell. It turned red and my toes looked like fat sausages. The swelling moved to my ankle and then half-way up my leg. My right foot continued to swell until it was twice the size of the left. Since my primary care physician was out of town, I saw a Nurse Practitioner, and she was excellent. She ordered an x-ray and, as often happens with a stress fracture, the x-ray didn’t show up. The Nurse Practitioner suggested another test.

“If the test shows a fracture, you will tell me to wear a boot for six weeks, right?” I asked.

“Yes,” she answered. The test is expensive and, to save time and money, I decided not to have it. Besides, I already had a protective boot in my closet, leftover from a fractured ankle I had last winter. The nurse practitioner told me to take over-the-counter pain medication, and stay off my feet as much as possible.  

“Good advice, but I’m my disabled husband’s caregiver,” I replied. She nodded her head in understanding.

Hobbling around in a boot is tiring, and out of necessity, I added new self-care steps to my list. I plan driving routes more carefully. I elevate my feet in the morning and again in the afternoon. I wash dishes at lunch time, and stash the evening dishes and pans in the dishwasher, a surprisingly helpful step. I asked the church Caring Committee for ready-to-eat meals, and a member of the congregation delivered enough food for three dinners.  

“You have to stop breaking bones,” my sister-in-law declared in an email. She was right. So I took the most important step and made an appointment with my primary care physician to discuss osteoporosis therapy. According to the Nurse Practitioner, new medications have been developed that slow the progression of osteoporosis. I hope my doctor will prescribe medicine that helps me.

Did you injure yourself? Did you catch a bad cold? Were you diagnosed with a chronic disease? If so, it may be time to add new self-care steps to your day. To care for your loved one, you must care for yourself. Small self-care steps can have a big impact on your energy and health.

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