Family caregivers have to go through a lot – giving care to a loved one can be frustrating, difficult, and heartbreaking. And that’s just normal, day-to-day life – things can become harder when a catastrophe happens, like a sudden fall or other critical, life-threatening injury.

Because of this, even family caregivers who live with their loved ones should be taking steps to help the one they’re caring for stay safe and avoid injury – especially in the bathroom.

The bathroom is the #1 place where elderly people fall – clocking in at 35.6% of all nonfatal falls in the elderly. Because of this, it should be one of your first priorities when it comes to the safety and security of the loved one you’re caring for.

We’ve put together a list of 5 of the easiest ways you can help secure the bathroom for your loved one, and help mitigate the risk of a disastrous fall. Check them out below.

 

1. Install Grab Bars

Grab bars are one of the simplest and least invasive precautionary measures you can install in your bathroom – and they’re quite inexpensive. These bars allow your loved one to have a solid surface to hold and grab, whether they’re just looking to keep their balance, or attempting to prevent a nasty fall.

Typically made of stainless steel or another high quality, sturdy material with a grippable synthetic or rubberized surface, grab bars are absolutely essential – and not just in the shower.

A greater majority of falls in the bathroom occur on the toilet – not the shower. Because of this, grab bars should be installed both in the shower, and near the toilet, where they can offer aid to your loved one when they’re attempting to sit down on the toilet, or stabilize themselves when getting up.

2. Prevent Slips – And Remove Trippable Rugs

Slipping is another huge cause of falls in the bathroom – a tiled surface with water or a shower without some kind of rubberized mat can be a huge risk to an elderly person who lacks balance or strength. Any surface that’s a risk should have a rubberized mat installed, with proper steps taken to ensure that the mat will not slip itself, and can drain water and other fluids away easily while maintaining a grippable surface.

Making sure that all rugs, mats, and non-slip surfaces are secured is incredibly important, as unsecured rugs and mats are another huge cause of falls. Think about it – your loved one will never assume that these items are out of place, so even the slightest movement or upturned corner could be enough to trip them up.

Remove dangerous rugs and mats, then replace them with secured rubberized mats that are non-slip, and won’t move around or turn up at the corners.

3. Pay Attention To The Toilet

As mentioned above, toilets pose an even greater risk than showers when it comes to accidental falls – this is due to the fact that they are used more often, and usually not perceived as risky – whereas most elderly people know that showers are slippery and could pose problems, and thus are alert, the toilet is viewed as an everyday necessity that’s not as dangerous, which can put them off their guard and cause accidents.

Besides grab bars, consider other safety equipment for toilets – items like raised toilet seats can be very helpful, as they integrate side-grip bars with a high-profile design that minimizes the time that the elderly spend trying to balance and sit on the seat.

Toilet safety rails can also be considered if the design of a bathroom precludes grab bars – these devices consist of two large, sturdy safety rails anchored to the side of the toilet, and allow for increased stability when attempting to stand up from a seated position.

4. Take A Second Look At The Shower

Once you’ve put in grab bars and non-slip mats, you may think the shower is totally safe, but you’re not quite there yet.

Exertion can be a problem when it comes to showering – the elderly are more likely to tire out physically, which can be an issue when combined with hot temperatures that their bodies are less suited to mitigate. Because of this, it’s recommended that further safety precautions be taken, beyond mats and bars.

Reorganizing the shower can be important – everything that your loved one needs during a shower should be accessible without moving or reaching – this can lead to catastrophe, even with grab bars and mats.

A shower stool may also be a good investment – combined with grab bars, it is rather simple to sit down and get up on these non-slip stools as necessary, adding safety and autonomy to the shower experience.

Another problem can be getting in and out of the shower – the steps necessary and the awkward balance required to swing a leg out of a bathtub or high shower can be extremely dangerous. To help mitigate this risk, shower steps can be used – these non-slip devices allow a higher step profile, and allow the user to descend more gradually.

If even that is too much of a risk, you may consider a walk-in tub or shower – while expensive, these specialized designs are very friendly to the elderly, allowing easy entrance and exits.

5. Improve Visibility

This is often overlooked – but the elderly tend to use the bathroom more, and tend to wake up multiple times at night to urinate.

This can be extremely dangerous, depending on the lighting conditions in your specific home, but these risks can be mitigated somewhat by night lighting running from the bedroom to the bathroom, or even motion-sensitive lighting in the bathroom.

Even the most alert elderly person may trip or fall if they can’t see what they’re walking on, so it’s essential that this risk is mitigated, especially in the already-dangerous bathroom.

Mitigate Risks, Maximize Safety and Autonomy

It may be embarrassing to discuss the details of bathroom safety needs with your loved ones, or the ones who you’re giving care to, but it’s absolutely essential. Even just one fall can lead to poor health outcomes and long recovery times, so catching these problem areas before an accident is absolutely essential.

Don’t delay. Take a deep look at the bathroom, figure out what steps need to be taken, and ensure the safety of your loved one, and help them regain more control and autonomy.


Jessica Hegg

 

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