They estimate that there are between 60 and 90 million family caregivers in the US. There are about 6.5 million professional caregivers, according to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics. There are millions more who have served as a caregiver at some point during their lives.

That’s a lot of different experiences.

But as much as each of our situations are unique, we have so much in common. It’s time to come together. With so many millions of people providing support, there’s no reason for any of us to feel alone.

My own take is that society’s lack of understanding and support is the main thing we have in common. There is no useful etiquette for dealing with illness and disability – our own or anybody else’s. As for a support infrastructure — mostly that’s a bad joke. Beyond this, however, it seems to me that our problems (and levels of opportunity) are all different.” – Sharon P.

“We all have different support situations, different personalities, and different energy and tolerance levels. I like how this page is here for all.” – Martha K.

“Mom is my priority…as always….If I plan something, it is planned in advance with arrangements made so that I don’t have to worry, and they all know I’m just a phone call away” – Traci S.

“I am a carer for my son. He has [a genetic disorder and autism]…Yet I read this post after returning from the spa…I have a supporting husband sharing in the care and a wide church family, most of whom are supportive a few are even offering practical help.” – Nancy H. D.

“I care give for free for people that either need me full time or others that need a break.” – T. B. T.

“I never fully embraced the caregiver moniker. All I can say is I endured. I changed. I have so much to pay forward my task honoring my husband’s memory has just begun.” Lauren B. C.

“We now…are in a position to have 48 hrs of private duty [help]. I’ve recently joined a gym and make time to go at least 3-4 days a week. My daughter can never be left unattended and I was lucky enough 2 yrs ago to hire a wonderful aide, besides my granddaughter who works with her Aunt on a regular basis.” – Patricia W.

“although caregiving can be awkward and demanding, I have the most personal freedom that I have ever had in my entire life. No regular hours, and I get to spend time on my writing (I’m an author of fiction), time watching my favourite TV shows and movies, and occasional time with friends. Plus, I have a husband who loves me and is good company.” – Xanxa S. R.

“I’m my husband’s caregiver and helper due to his memory loss from combat PTSD but he is also my caregiver in all things physical for my RA & Fibro. We care for each other in the ways that we are stronger than the other.” – Carly D. R.

I’m 53. I care for my 46 year old brother who lives with me…MWF I send him to the adult/senior day center run by Catholic Services (you do not have to be Catholic to attend and it is not a church service). Nurses are on hand, they go on field trips, play games and are served breakfast and lunch. During these days I work as a caregiver for an agency helping others…Or, I can choose not to work those days and just sleep in or catch up with friends, family or my favorite tv shows.” – Lisa K. C.

My mom has Severe Dementia, is incontinent and non-ambulatory. She is is a full-time nursing home, but I go every day (sometimes twice daily) to check on her, help to feed her, pick-up or take back her laundry, make sure she is getting the care an attention she needs, is taking her meds, take her outside for walks, bring her special treats and and meals and to tell her and show her that I love her.” – Renee F. H.

Everyone who is supporting someone through illness, disability, or disease is welcome here. Are you new to the community? Introduce yourself here.

Some of the quotes were edited for length. You can read the original posts on Facebook.

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