You’re a family caregiver and need outside help. These days, most large and mid-size towns have caregiving agencies. Before you sign with an agency do your research. Keep in mind that it can you weeks to adapt to a paid caregiver. That’s because you are creating a partnership.    

My husband’s legs are mostly paralyzed and I’m his primary caregiver. With help from therapists he learned to stand, stand and pivot, and walk 50 steps with the aid of a walker. Still, he needs lots of support. I’m on the job 24/7 and rely on paid caregivers. A caregiver comes each morning and stays for two hours.

The training and expertise of paid caregivers varies widely. Retired nurses, nursing assistants, and nursing students are an ideal match for our situation. Just as I want the best for my husband, I want the best for paid caregivers. You probably want the same and these tips will help you forge a partnership..

Start with a home “tour”

Even if your place is small, the caregiver needs to get a sense of the space. Caregivers need to know where the linen closet is, where incontinence supplies are stored, which drawers contain underwear, and which contain socks. I store towels in baskets with labels: towel sets, hand towels, floor towels (for the shower wheelchair puddles and drips).

Explain your daily routine

Our routine is so detailed that the agency created a task list for caregivers, a practical idea and one you may wish to use. I think a routine helps caregivers and care receivers alike. It also helps with time management. Spending too much time on one task deletes others.

Take advantage of perks

Most caregiving agencies allow caregivers to do light housekeeping and you may as well take advantage of this. I ask the caregiver to dust, vacuum, clean mirrors, etc. The caregivers know where my cleaning supplies are stored and I keep them well stocked.

Follow agency rules

Paid caregivers aren’t allowed to dispense prescribed medications or apply prescribed lotions. Always heed these rules. Still, I tell the caregiver about the medications my husband is taking because some cause sleepiness.

Frame concise, clear sentences

Caregivers must adapt to different settings, people, routines, and equipment. Often they race from one client to the next. To save time, be as concise as possible. For example, “Please carry the laundry basket to the laundry room.”

Share special needs

My husband wears a brace when he practices walking and getting ready is a process. The nine steps: 1) put on support socks; 2) put on shoes; 3) put brace on left leg; 4) put lift on right foot to equalize the length of his legs; 5) put half sock on left shoe so the paralyzed leg can slide; 7) get the walker; 8) brace the walker as he stands; 9) Be ready to catch him if he falls. I help my husband stand and follow behind with the electric wheelchair.

Follow the Golden Rule

Treat caregivers as you would like to be treated. When the caregiver leaves I say, “Thanks for your help.” According to one caregiver, we’re the only people who do this. Without paid caregivers I would be an exhausted, aching, discouraged wife. Paid caregivers make my days easier. Cheers for them all!

About Harriet Hodgson

Rochester resident Harriet Hodgson has been a freelance writer for 37 years, is the author of thousands of Internet/print articles, and 35 books. She is a member of the Association of Health Care Journalists and the Minnesota Coalition for Death Education and Support.

She is also a contributing writer for The Caregiver Space website, Open to Hope Foundation website, and The Grief Toolbox website. Harriet has appeared on more than 185 radio talk shows, including CBS Radio, and dozens of television stations, including CNN.

A popular speaker, Harriet has given presentations at public health, Alzheimer’s, caregiving, and bereavement conferences. Her work is cited in Who’s Who of American Women, World Who’s Who of Women, Contemporary Authors, and other directories.

All of Harriet’s work comes from her life. She is now in her 19th year of caregiving and cares for her disabled husband, John. For more information about this busy author, grandmother, wife, and caregiver please visit www.harriethodgson.com

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