You’ve heard the term “caregiver burden”, right? It’s the stress and strain that comes with caring for someone who is ill, elderly, or disabled. Lots of people don’t really like it, since it can easily seem like the person you’re caring for is a burden.

I was thinking about this while reading the story of The Perfect Servant. She’s really honest about what a burden caregiving can be, but it’s also clear that the love her and her husband share is incredible. We don’t want the person we’re caring for to feel like they’re a burden or to further stigmatize their condition.

Is there a better term? How can we talk about the stress of caregiving without placing blame on the person we care for?


I am reaching a new level of care for Deb as she is incontinent of bowel and bladder to the point that she has lost all control. Her MS is putting her body thru some new changes. Her fatigue is such that a lift may now be getting close. My own ability to care for her as a 66 year old man is being called into question. I bring this up to address the word “burden”. Is it now a burden to care for a woman I have been married to for over 32 years, who has always given more to me than me to her and has been in a w/c for over 7 years and I am her nearly full time caregiver. To say it is not burdensome physically and emotionally is naïve and dishonest. However, this burden is filled with that intangible gift of love we have been given and I want to share and honor that with her.

Jerry



It’s like I have been trying to instill in my son, there can’t be blame. It’s an awful word to start with, when you consider the meaning. Things happen, it’s called life. It’s called what God and Jesus hand to you and expect you to do right by. I firmly believe in both God and Jesus. God picks who we are, boy or girl, short or tall, autistic or not. Jesus gives us our heart and soul, and expects us to love unconditionally always.

My son didn’t ask to be autistic any more than my dad asked to suddenly grow weak and unable to take care of himself 100% of the time. I certainly did not ask to deal with chronic pain, PTSD, have my neck fused, and more. Blaming or saying someone is a burden disrespects God, Jesus, and the person who has become dependent on others in daily life.

I would encourage someone to seek counseling because it really helps. If not counseling, find that someone who would not mind being a sounding board. Not to give advice as much as there to listen to the struggles, the
fears, the joys and the frustrations of being a caregiver.

Most important of all, find that time for yourself. 15 minutes here, 15 minutes there. Read, listen to music, watch a favorite tv show, it doesn’t matter as long as you are giving yourself time to focus on something other than the person you are caring for. Balance is key to not feeling the need to use the word blame.

Mimi


How about “moral responsibility”? Caregiving applies to the circumstance but the heavy feeling of a burden comes from outside the role of a caregiver. These emotions stem from a desire to believe in hope for humanity. That no matter who or what we are, when faced with a need, at the stake of human condition, we will take action… We care cause we relate to the fact that might easily be the one in need and I hope the same moral conflict in others will still exist and someone will be kind enough to help me!

Ashley


As a caregiver to a loved one, there are different levels of emotion before the sense of burden comes along. And once it does, then there’s guilt for feeling burdened. That comes from not getting those much needed breaks for ourselves.

Teresa


There is a wide range of emotions that come long before one falls into the ‘burden-guilt’ trap…but something we don’t talk about often for caregivers is the need for self-care. I was fortunate enough to hear an interview with a caregiver (on CBC – Sunday Edition) just a few months before my caregiving journey started in earnest. I learned a few things: the importance of accepting help and the importance of taking time for myself. I’ve only faltered when I didn’t do one or the other (or both!)

Honestly – I don’t feel burden or ‘why me’ … I feel blessed that I have so much support in my life. For my husband, I only feel love. As much as I’ve been his caregiver, he is my rock in so many other things.

I know I am so very fortunate. and for that I’m grateful. For me, there is no burden, just love and gratitude.

Sylvia



I am a nurse practitioner. In the field of nursing we call it “burnout” when the burdens of caring and providing for others fatigues you to the point of exhaustion and inability to often meet your and/or your family’s needs.

Donna


It is a challenge.
It is a burden.
Above all of that it is a responsibility.
Caregiver Responsibilities.
We are the capeless heroes that never get a casserole.

Kim


I have given care for years to various ones. First as an RN and then as a mom who had a terminally ill child, then, my parents. Still in the midst of caring for my mom. I liken the fatigue I felt with my son, as PTSD. I didn’t realize it at the time. Burnout is another term I’ve used. Fatigue is yet another term. I don’t think I’ve ever placed blame on the person I’m caring for, but more on myself for not being able to meet all the challenges.

I love what I do, I would not want it any other way. What we, as caregivers extraordinaire, need is the ability to find time away to regroup and recharge. We need the ability to not go broke in caring for our loved ones. That alone, would remove stress from our lives. Tax laws should be changed to give us a break on this. We are keeping our loved ones from becoming a burden on society on the tax payers dime. I try to remember that I am serving my Lord and Savior as I care for my mom. I am honoring my parents, as is commanded. May God bless each of you, as you care for your loved ones.

Sherelyn



It does seem like any concern is a complaint when it is not. It is just a plea for how something can be done better or easier for both. This is definitely a learning process but one that has no room for error on either side.

Diane


I place all the blame on myself, why not everyone else does. I’ve been taking care of my parents for 20 plus years, I even bought the house next door to them for convenience.

My dad passed away last March on my mom’s birthday so now it’s just mom. She has COPD and its very bad. She only goes on 3 rooms of her house and has anxiety issues that prevent her from leaving her house, period. This is a constant battle with her because she does not allow me to be gone because she will panic. My family is headed out the door at the moment to go on a much needed fishing trip and I get left behind. I do not resent my mother for this.

I am sitting here waiting for her to ring the wireless door bell I have for her letting me know she up so I can do our daily care routine, I do not resent her for this. I love my mother and would never leave her in a million years, but it’s exhausting at times because she has no zest for life, all she wants to do is smoke (she’s been quit for a while now ) she asks and I say no, she resents me for this, I feel guilty because I am not giving her what she wants, it’s my fault she’s not happy and she lets me know about it to, this is where I resent her attitude towards me.

If I give on, she will end up in the hospital just like every time before and its my fault, my family says so, and so do I. Its not burn out exactly, it’s not knowing what to do when she gets like this and no matter what choice I make it comes down to her health or her happiness.

Genie


My burnout and frustrations came from family not working with me as a team to help take care of Mom … And accusing, ridiculing and blaming me for the dysfunction.

Linda


I’ve been a caregiver for six years for my,now, 91 year old mom. Once she said to me; “I feel like I’m a burden to you.” I knew that denying that would be a lie so I said in a soft and loving way; “yes, sometimes caring for you is a burden just like I was to you when I was young and you were raising me as a single mother. But that doesn’t mean we give up just because something is challenging. Our love, commitment and loyalty means we stay and we persevere. My dog got me up three times last night and that was a burden but that doesn’t mean I give her away or that I don’t love her.”

My mom nodded and replied; “I’m so grateful to you.” And my response was; “I love you and I’ll always be here for you.” Something my two older sisters know nothing about.

Kellie


Caregiver stress syndrome is a much better term. There are degrees of it just like any other syndrome. Burden allows the greater society to continue to ‘blame the victim’. We blame the person who took on the role of caring for another person instead of providing adequate services and supports.

And for those who don’t want to be called caregiver: this is why we do it: in order to access services and supports we have to call the person giving of their love, time and effort something. The political will to support ‘grand daughter’ or ‘husband’ or ‘wife’ doesn’t exist in the US.

Those of us in caregiving research often wore the same shoes and walked the path. We use the term caregiving or care partner or dyadic care in order to try to get the local, state and federal funding to assist those who provide care. We don’t do it without thought.

Jeananne


It is what it is. And it’s not the patients fault, but we have to acknowledge the true weight of what caregivers go through.

Michaela


You can come up with something a little more tactful, yes, but there’s no positive spin on what it really is.

Penny


 

About Cori Carl

As Director, Cori develops our comprehensive global communications and development strategy. She’s constantly tweaking our services based on data-driven marketing metrics and feedback from caregivers. She works to grow our community and build the reputation of The Caregiver Space by amplifying the message on social media, cultivating relationships with experts, creating organizational partnerships, and earning media coverage. She’s an active member of the community and regularly creates resources for Caregivers.

Cori joined The Caregiver Space after a decade of serving as a communications consultant for a number of nonprofit organizations and corporations furthering sustainable energy and urban planning solutions.

Cori has an MA in Corporate Communications from Baruch College at CUNY and a BA in Media Studies from Eugene Lang College at the New School University. She divides her time between Brooklyn and Toronto.

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