We talk a lot about how rewarding and meaningful caregiving can be. Most of us would never trade our responsibilities, but that doesn’t mean caregiving isn’t the most difficult thing we’ve ever done.

Instead of trying to sugarcoat it, how about offering caregivers some real support?

I cared for my mom for 10.5 years after her stroke. She moved in with me when I was 29 and moved to an assisted living when I was 40. Now she is about to transition to a Nursing Home. So scary, because as many of you know, out country SUCKS at taking care of its citizens, but especially the elderly.

What many didn’t realize is that, although she hasn’t lived with me for two years, I still have to deal with the pads, the briefs, the meetings, the unanswered call lights, the endless phone calls (sometimes 50+ a day) because she is lonely.

It’s exhausting. It’s guilt ridden. It’s unforgiving. – Greta M.

You are so right, some days you feel like you cant even BREATHE! My dear mother in law has had Alzheimer’s over 17years already! My mother has had dementia over 3 years and we take care of her at home 24/7! The stress level among the siblings is through the roof! God Bless all caretakers its the hardest job in the world and unless you have lived it you have no clue. – Tammy B.

Everyone thought I would get a break when my Granny had to be admitted into the nursing home when she broke her shoulder. They called me numerous times daily and would ask when I would be there to sit with her because with her Alzheimer’s she was a handful for them. It was just as exhausting and I hated that she was there. – Chris M.

Caregiving has been my life for 4 years now…it is the worst. I lost my retirement, I’m losing my home, and frankly people are sick of hearing of my son and his illnesses. The worst question of all “when will he get better?” again, no, he won’t ever get better. – Paula P.

My husband has been battling head, neck, and lung cancer for 5 years. He gets his health care through the VA because his cancer was caused by Agent Orange. While we have no financial issues, the stress gets overwhelming just the same. His 3 kids have never offered to go to a doctors appointment with him, or stay with him to give me a break. Sometimes I just want to yell at someone. – Brenda I.

It’s all about attitude. You can either sit around woo-is-me-ing or you can find joy in little things and not be as miserable. I’ve been caring for my father with dementia for 7 years now. I’m 36, not married, living with my parents to do this, have no clue how I’ll survive or even work after all is said is done and children are now out of the question. Sometimes I succumb to the misery and have a good cry. But the next day, I list what I’m thankful for, even if it’s just coffee, my cats, or the weather; try to put everything back into God’s hands; and smile when dad says “good morning” or “I love you” back to me or my mom. – Susan F.

It’s all about how you spin the situation. I’ve been taking care of my husband for 1.5 years as we battle throat cancer. I’m no iron maiden, or super woman. I spend my days exhausted and often in tears. Caregiving does suck, but you’d best suck it up and get a handle your misplaced frustration. – Fiona S.

I took care of my mother for 20 years until she passed. While I was able to work, that was my only outside activity. It messed up my young adulthood and my adult life. I had no vacations during that time. My sibling hardly ever stepped up and helped out cause he lived a couple of hours from me. Like many caregivers I have diabetes and heart disease. It takes a large toll over time. Would I do it again…No, not in the manner I did it. I now have no children to help me out in my old age. I now advice people, take care of yourself FIRST. Seek balance and don’t make that sever of sacrifices! – Karen T.

I’ve been caring for both of my parents for over 21+ yrs. I’m tired of this. When My Dad Asked Me 21 YEARS ago to stop working to take care of them, I never thought it would be this hard. My mom is stage 3 Alzheimers and can’t walk due to her stroke and my father had leukemia.

I hate it when people ask if I need help to just give them a call only to come up with an excuse.

I even become angry when these so called caregiver experts giving advice when they themselves aren’t experience caregivers. Many of these so called experts always have the same excuse when I challenge their credentials as to call this number or person about their caregiver experience. Yet I’m grateful to the very few who contacted me saying that they have experience in taking care of a family member. – Bob H.

It’s not an easy road to travel. There are organizations that raise money for research, but none for caregiver assistance. There are many that offer help, but it comes with a hefty price tag. After several years of suffering from ALZ, my sweet Mother left this earth on Aug. 12. I was her caregiver during these years. I watched my Mom totally disappear and at the end, her family was with her as she drew her last breath. – Pamela M.

I’m my moms caregiver and its draining, my life isn’t what I had expected… but to not have her here with me and our family that would be more devastating. – Harper R.

Talking about how hard caregiving can be is not meant to make you feel bad. It’s just a hard place for caregivers. It doesn’t change that we love the people we support and want to be sure they’re ok! – Karen B.

It’s so hard because you feel guilt for wanting time alone but I’ve been doing this caregiving now for almost a year by myself after my father was killed, my mom had a stroke and is in a wheel chair and has no left leg control…she’s a total dependent. I am an only child, 35 and I am already burnt out.I have some help in the mornings so I can work, but all nights and weekends are on me and I am exhausted! – Lisa R.

Caregiving IS rewarding. And it can suck. At the same time. I’ve been caregiving to a family member for 18 years and helping a team of carers do the same and it can be inspiring and uplifting. The ingenuity and love and generosity of spirit of other caregivers inspires you. And the strength of spirit of the person being cared for, if you are lucky enough for that to be intact. But, yes, it is exhausting and at times you’re on your knees thinking “What can we do next that might be of use as so far I’ve done everything and I don’t think I’m helping.” All you can do is be there or make sure others are when you can’t be who are loving and generous of heart and… that’s about it, I guess. – Phil D.

It sucks. It’s draining. It’s tiring. It’s hard. It’s painful. It’s lonely. It takes someone special to do it. It’s what we do. We never stop. – Jeannine G.

It really does suck. It sucks your energy and your attitude. Some days, it sucks your sense of humor right out of you. But we keep on, caring for that loved one as best we can, given the rotten circumstances. – Gretchen M.

We have long term health care insurance that we can access for assistance, but here’s the thing. How to convince my sick husband we need a stranger in the house to help us out? Exactly when will he think it’s “time” to call them in? I work full time and teach at a law school one class a week. And get the house cleaned, dogs fed and groomed, lawn mowed and other landscaping done, etc. yet if I want any time to myself – a conference out of town – even a late dinner with a girlfriend – I get the passive aggressive guilt treatment. I have cancelled out of and left early from more obligations I’d like to think about. He refuses to see an end of life therapist and some of his family is somewhere on a barge on the River Denial. His illness is terminal, there is no more treatment available and things are just going to get worse. So I’m not feeling the “rewarding” part at all and I don’t think your attitude needs any sort of adjustment. Keep enough of you going so you can live and enjoy life after they are gone. – Melissa M.

This damn job is no fun, but yes, there are some funny moments. It’s also heartbreaking, nerve racking, anxiety filled, scary, worrisome, difficult…I could go on all night. No, it’s not rewarding, but my parents deserve the best I can give them and so much more. – Frank A.

Its a miserable existence! Pee and crap everywhere, wandering, literally being beat up, scratched and bit, just for trying to clean her up! My MIL hallucinates and talks crazy all the time. Disassembles every object in the house, and cannot be left alone for 5 minutes! – Vickie B.

I didn’t think it was gonna be this overwhelming and such a big life changer, but I’ll do anything for my 90 yr old Grandma. My reward is God letting me spend our days together. – Adriana E.

You lose your loved one, you lose yourself, you lose your family and friends. And you are unable to help your children and grandchildren. – Elsebeth P.

Some comments have been edited for clarity or grammar.

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