In 2013 my husband’s aorta dissected. He had three emergency operations and, during the third one, suffered a spinal cord injury that paralyzed his legs. The night I drove him to the hospital I became his primary caregiver and advocate. After being hospitalized for eight months my husband was released to my care.

Catheterization was part of this care. Every morning at 3 a.m. the alarm clock went off, and I stumbled out of bed to help my husband catheterize. Afterwards he usually went back to sleep. I didn’t. Instead, I tossed and turned and worried about the coming day. Although a paid caregiver came at 6:30 a.m. and stayed two hours to get my husband up, I was still involved in his care.  

By one in the afternoon I was yearning for sleep. Interrupted sleep took a toll on me, and may be taking a toll on you. Perhaps you get up in the middle of the night to give a loved one medicine. You may have to get up to rescue a loved one who has fallen down. Personal health problems—arthritis, bursitis, restless legs, and bathroom breaks—may interrupted your sleep.

Rick Nauert, PhD examines this sleep disorder in “Interrupted sleep Can Be as Harmful as  No Sleep,” posted on the PsycCentral website. He uses new parents as examples of interrupted sleep. Although they’re awake a short time, interrupted sleep disrupts the parents’ normal sleep rhythms. “Parents often report feeling more exhausted in the morning than when they went to bed the night before,” he explains.

Nauert cites a study published in the journal of Sleep Medicine that states interrupted sleep is equivalent to no more than four hours of consecutive sleep. Wow! One thing is sure: You need at least seven hours of sleep. Over time, interrupted sleep can become sleep deprivation, and it’s dangerous.

According to a WebMD article, “10 Things to Hate About Sleep Loss,” the dangers of lack of sleep include:

  • Slower reaction time
  • Impaired thinking
  • Increased risk of heart disease
  • High blood pressure
  • Increased risk of stroke, diabetes
  • Lower sex drive
  • Depression
  • Impaired memory
  • Increased weight gain

“Sleep loss impairs judgment, especially about sleep,” the article concludes.

Thankfully, I found some solutions for interrupted sleep. To give me an extra hour of sleep, I changed the paid caregivers’ arrival time from 6:30 a.m. to 7:30 a.m. I followed the advice of my husband’s occupational therapist. Her idea: make a catheterization kit and let my husband, a retired physician, catheterize himself. I made the kit and set it on his bedside table.

Stacy M. Peterson and Brooke L. Werneburg, in their Mayo Clinic website article  “Sleep: The Foundation of Healthy Habits,” ask patients to establish a bedtime routine. We had a good routine; I just started it 45 minutes earlier. I continued to take naps when I needed them. However, I was careful not to nap for more than an hour.

Interrupted sleep is a serious health problem. Don’t let interruptive sleep interrupt your life and caregiving. Take action now!

About Harriet Hodgson

Rochester resident Harriet Hodgson has been a freelance writer for 37 years, is the author of thousands of Internet/print articles, and 35 books. She is a member of the Association of Health Care Journalists and the Minnesota Coalition for Death Education and Support.

She is also a contributing writer for The Caregiver Space website, Open to Hope Foundation website, and The Grief Toolbox website. Harriet has appeared on more than 185 radio talk shows, including CBS Radio, and dozens of television stations, including CNN.

A popular speaker, Harriet has given presentations at public health, Alzheimer’s, caregiving, and bereavement conferences. Her work is cited in Who’s Who of American Women, World Who’s Who of Women, Contemporary Authors, and other directories.

All of Harriet’s work comes from her life. She is now in her 19th year of caregiving and cares for her disabled husband, John. For more information about this busy author, grandmother, wife, and caregiver please visit www.harriethodgson.com

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